Archive for the ‘Craig’s novels on South Africa’ Category

Craig’s Books on His Great Passion* South Africa

July 24, 2014

Table Mountain (John)

Picture of Table Mountain (great) by my old friend John (“the world’s third worst photographer”, so he calls himself), but whose photographic talents I definitely do NOT possess)!
web sites: http://www.jetpix.wordpress.com and http://www.johnsphotopics.wordpress.com

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=craig%20lock%20%2B%20South%20Africa

* other than his dear family, of course (+ writing, motor racing and “the spiritual journey”)

“Don’t bend; don’t water it down; don’t try to make it logical; don’t edit your own soul according to the fashion. Rather, follow your most intense obsessions mercilessly.”
~ Franz Kafka

The various books* that Craig “felt inspired to write” are available at http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=la_B005GGMAW4_sr?rh=i%3Abooks&field-author=Craig+Lock
http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4 http://www.creativekis.com/amazon.html and http://goo.gl/vTpjk

All proceeds go to needy and underprivileged children –
MINE!

Angolan Dawn

January 12, 2014

Angolan Dawn

Angolan Dawn )ebook)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The paperback version of Angolan Dawn should be out later today at http://www.amazon.com/Angolan-Dawn-story-nations-agony/dp/1494988747/

Angolan Dawn (createspace)

 

 

 

 

The various books that Craig “felt inspired to write” are available at

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=la_B005GGMAW4_sr?rh=i%3Abooks&field-author=Craig+Lock

http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4 and http://goo.gl/vTpjk

The End Of The Line

November 27, 2013

EndLine

The End Of The Line

A story based on fact in the dark days
of grand apartheid, but with the rich
promise and hope that a new South Africa
can bring.

 

 

 

 

“The past is another country”

 

SEA AND SAND

Sea and sand
My love
My land,
God bless Africa
Many sunsets
Gold and crimson
Have dripped on the horizon,
Weeping for the dying day.
Many dawns have risen
In timely resurrection
From their cradles of light
Sunsets and dawns
Dawns and sunsets
I have seen them all
But when,
Oh when will I see that day
When love will walk the common way
To heal my wounded people
And break the shackles around their hearts?
– Don Mattera.
I love that poem.

The paperback version of The End Of The Line  is available at http://www.amazon.com/The-End-Of-Line-Volume/dp/1858633931

The various books that Craig “felt inspired to write” (including his various novels on South Africa) are available at:

http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=la_B005GGMAW4_sr?rh=i%3Abooks&field-author=Craig+Lock&sort=relevance&ie=UTF8&qid

http://goo.gl/vTpjk and http://www.creativekiwis.com/amazon.html

MY VERY FIRST BOOK REVIEW (online) …definitely one to remember!

November 17, 2012

MY FIRST BOOK REVIEW (online)

MY FIRST BOOK REVIEW (online) of ‘THE END OF THE LINE’ (my first published book)

Definitely one to frame and keep for posterity…then hand to my grandchildren!

Review by: am on Aug. 12, 2011 :
“I bought three books about the apartheid era from Smashwords. One was great, one was amazing and professional quality. This one was terrible. Unreadable pap, written by someone with no capacity for critical thought.

The author has evidently been under a rock since 1993. His memoir/novel/whatever ends in 1993, with his liberal utopia being realized, and he has no idea what happened afterwards. It’s been EIGHTEEN YEARS. Did you read the newspaper ONCE since then? Where is your utopia now? Why haven’t you moved back to South Africa to enjoy its fruits?

He also can’t write and can’t edit his writing. He writes like a third grader with a learning impediment. The first chapter or so might look half decent but after that it gets unreadable. Absolutely do not buy this under any circumstances.”

“name witheld” (but what a “doos“*, who has absolutely nil understanding of the country, nor of my journey and personal circumstances!)

From http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/42710

Perhaps After that review I should have given up writing… but then I’m a very persistent “bugger”…and anyway what other job would be suitable for me!

“a not so sensitive little soul/arty-farty writer type”

 * If you want to know what that “funny” word means just go to google south africa

PS

”Man invented language in order to satisfy his need to complain.”
– Canadian linguist Steven Pinker

“One man’s (or woman’s) poison is another man’s meat”

That’s a metaphor, by the way

Thank goodness we  all have different tastes…whether a vegetarian or not!

Craig’s first novel on South Africa The End Of The Line (Volume 1) [Paperback] is available at

http://www.amazon.com/The-End-Of-Line-Volume/dp/1858633931

The End of the Line (South Africa) [Kindle Edition] is available at:

http://www.amazon.com/The-Line-South-Africa-ebook/dp/B005HY6YLI

All proceeds go to needy and underprivileged children –

MINE!

Hardly surprising then, craig. If you write so badly, then no wonder you get reviews like that!

PPS

After that “review”, fortunately (or perhaps “unfortunately” for you dear readers, I didn’t slinker off and crawl into a rabbit hole in the ground never to be heard of again, nor to write another word…but still ended up, a “chicken-runner” on the other side of the world here  in the Antipodes…embarrassed, humiliated and totally shattered!

Only joking

“It’s not the critic who counts. It’s not the man who points out how the strong man stumbled. Credit belongs to the man who really was in the arena, his face marred by dust, sweat, and blood, who strives valiantly, who errs to come short and short again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming. It is the man who actually strives to do the deeds, who knows the great enthusiasm and knows the great devotion, who spends himself on a worthy cause, who at best, knows in the end the triumph of great achievement. And, who at worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and cruel souls who know neither victory nor defeat.”

– Theodore Roosevelt

The various books that Craig ‘felt inspired to write’ (including ‘THE END OF THE LINE) are available at:

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=la_B005GGMAW4_sr?rh=i%3Abooks&field-author=Craig+Lock

http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4 and http://goo.gl/vTpjk

Don’t worry about the world ending today…

it’s already tomorrow in “little scenic and tranquil” New Zealand

from http://www.sawriter.wordpress.com

 

“Somewhat of a Review” of the Film: ‘CATCH A FIRE’ and Sharing a few Personal Thoughts

October 12, 2012

“Somewhat of a Review” of the Film: ‘CATCH A FIRE’ and Sharing a few Personal Thoughts
(written by Shawn Slovo and her producer sister, Robyn)
Submitted and shared by Craig Lock
Category/Tags (Key words): Films, South Africa, stories of South Africa. Catch a Fire, Gillian Slovo, Forgiveness, Reconciliation. Pursuit of peace

Web sites: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4 and http://www.creativekiwis.com/amazon.html
Craig’s blogs (with extracts from his various writings: articles, books and new manuscripts) are at www.sharefaith.wordpress.com.wordpress.comwww.buildbridgesofunity.wordpress.com www.buildbridgesofunderstanding.wordpress.com www.breakdownwalls.wordpress.com http://religiousunity.wordpress.comwww.peacepursuit.wordpress.com http://craigsblogs.wordpress.com + so many others I can’t keep track (obsessive or WHAT!)

Other Articles are available at: http://www.selfgrowth.com/articles/user/15565 and http://www.ideamarketers.com/library/profile.cfm?writerid=981
(Personal growth, self help, writing, internet marketing, spiritual, ‘spiritual writings’ (how ‘airey-fairey’), words of inspiration and money management, how boring now, craig)

Publishing Guidelines

All my articles may be freely published

Submitter’s Note:

Like the writers, producers and directors of ‘Catch the Fire’, I too love to write and share stories that matter a lot to me, in terms of my deepest values (“the artistic temprament”??). True stories from people’s lives in history, that are worth sharing with others, as they have great meaning regarding the universal human condition. So I write about ordinary people in exceptional circumstances and times, that hopefully uplift and impact others through certain people’s great generosity of spirit inherant in the human condition to overcome great obstacles or adversity in their lives! My stories are about the indominatable and unquenchable strength of the human spirit… and ‘Catch a Fire’ is a story that I would have loved to have written … but now that it’s been done by Shawn and Robyn Slovo far more personally, bigger and better than I could ever have done. I found the story of the film so moving, compelling and inspiring, just “impulsively” wanted to share with you and encourage you to see this uplifting and inspiring movie.
*
The Movie ‘CATCH A FIRE’

31 Oct 2006 – Source: United Methodist News Service

Hero of ‘Catch a Fire’ tells church about apartheid era.

“I have learned to remember the words of my friend, Nelson Mandela, when he said, ‘We can never be free, unless we learn to forgive.'” Those are the words of Patrick Chamusso, a former prisoner on South Africa’s Robben Island with Mandela.

“Nelson Mandela told us to offer forgiveness. He even forgave the person who held him prisoner all those years at Robben Island.”

The movie depicts Chamusso’s transformation from an oil refinery worker to a freedom fighter. He was a foreman at the centrally located Secunda oil refinery, which was a symbol of South Africa’s self-sufficiency at a time when the world was instituting economic sanctions and protesting the country’s apartheid system. It was also a symbol of the wealth and riches of South Africa, earned in part from the exploitation of cheap black labor.

In his spare time, Chamusso coached a local boys’ soccer team. He was by no means a political man and would not have dreamed of becoming a member of Nelson Mandela’s freedom party, the African National Congress. That changed when Chamusso was arrested upon suspicion of sabotage of Secunda in 1980. He was beaten, tortured and mentally abused. When his wife, Precious was beaten and arrested, Chamusso was stunned into action. He left his family and joined the African National Congress in Mozambique, where he met Joe Slovo, the head of the congress’ military wing and later a cabinet member in Mandela’s first post-apartheid government.

In 1981, Chamusso attacked the Secunda refinery in a mission designed by Slovo. After the bombing, he was captured and arrested, held for nine months without trial and brutally tortured.

“I became angry to my God,” Chamusso said, as he recalled his detention. “I said, ‘Where are you?’ I am going to face the judge, and I know I’m going to die.’ But I didn’t. I was supposed to have the death sentence for what I did, but the judge gave me 24 years… It was God.”

Chamusso was imprisoned on Robben Island along with Nelson Mandela and other political prisoners. Chamusso said the only way he was able to survive prison was by praying. He served 10 years, received amnesty and was released in 1991.

‘We must forgive!’

“At first, I thought it wasn’t a good story, because I didn’t value myself as a human being,” Chamusso said. “The reason was the structure of apartheid in South Africa. It was directed at a black man. I couldn’t open a bank account in South Africa; because I must take a white man with me. I couldn’t buy a car without a white man. If there was a road block, they would pull me out of the car, search me and beat me in front of my children. But we said, ‘We forgive you people.’ Through forgiveness, you let go of the anger and put it down. You forget it!”

Chamusso said he gets upset when people compare what he did in South Africa to current acts of terrorism.
“I think anyone who compares this to terrorism doesn’t understand,” he said. “There is no comparison. We were trying to remove apartheid. Our policy was, ‘No one must die.’ We wanted to destroy apartheid, not kill people.”

“We must tell the truth, but we must also forgive,” he said.
Today Chamusso, his wife, Conney and their three children live in White River, a valley region north of Johannesburg. They have at least 80 orphans whom they have adopted and care for through their ministry called ‘Two Sisters’.

“I wake up every morning and say, ‘Lord, thank you. For my life’, thank you Lord for me still being alive’.”
‘Catch a Fire’ screenwriter Shawn Slovo, daughter of the late Joe Slovo: “I thought it was a good time to tell the story, because of the miracle of South Africa,” she said, explaining why she wrote the film.

The movie “about reconciliation is timely, because it has been a period of time that it seems like all hell has broken loose in the world.” “If you just browse the paper, you can see that violence has escalated around the globe. It all comes down to broken relationships. So as we make peace with God, it is possible for each one of us to make peace.”

31 Oct 2006 – Source: United Methodist News Service

* *
“I have learned to remember the words of my friend, Nelson Mandela, when he said, ‘We can never be free unless we learn to forgive.'” Those are the words of Patrick Chamusso, a former prisoner on South Africa’s Robben Island with Mandela.

He spoke and worshipped at Munger Place United Methodist Church, while visiting Dallas as part of a promotional tour for the movie “Catch a Fire,” which debuts in US cinemas this week. The movie tells the story of his life and his struggle as a freedom fighter in apartheid-era South Africa.

“Nelson Mandela told us to offer forgiveness,” said Chamusso, a member of White River Methodist Church north of Johannesburg, South Africa. “He even forgave the person who held him prisoner all those years at Robben Island.”

The Rev. Charles L Stovall, pastor of Munger Place Church, invited Chamusso and the movie’s cast and crew to the church, after learning they would be promoting the film in Dallas. Stovall represented the United Methodist Church on the Ecumenical Monitoring Team for South African’s first multi-racial election, an election that made Nelson Mandela South Africa’s first black president.
*
Stunned into action!

In the film, Chamusso is portrayed by Derek Luke, who starred in ‘Antwone Fisher’, ‘Friday Night Lights’ and ‘Glory Road’.
The movie depicts Chamusso’s transformation from an oil refinery worker to a freedom fighter. He was a foreman at the centrally located Secunda oil refinery, which was a symbol of South Africa’s self-sufficiency at a time when the world was instituting economic sanctions and protesting the country’s apartheid system. It was also a symbol of the wealth and riches of South Africa, earned in part from the exploitation of cheap black labor.

In his spare time, Chamusso coached a local boys’ soccer team. He was by no means a political man and would not have dreamed of becoming a member of Nelson Mandela’s freedom party, the African National Congress.

That changed when Chamusso was arrested upon suspicion of sabotage of Secunda in 1980. He was beaten, tortured and mentally abused. When his wife, Precious – played by South African television actress Bonnie Henna – was beaten and arrested, Chamusso was stunned into action. He left his family and joined the African National Congress in Mozambique, where he met Joe Slovo, the head of the congress’s military wing and later a cabinet member in Mandela’s first post-apartheid government.

In 1981, Chamusso attacked the Secunda refinery in a mission designed by Slovo. After the bombing, he was captured and arrested, held for nine months without trial and brutally tortured.

“I became angry to my God,” Chamusso said, as he recalled his detention. “I said, ‘Where are you?’ I am going to face the judge, and I know I’m going to die.’ But I didn’t. I was supposed to have the death sentence for what I did, but the judge gave me 24 years… It was God.”

Chamusso was imprisoned on Robben Island, where fellow Methodist layman, Nelson Mandela was incarcerated. Chamusso said the only way he was able to survive prison was by praying. He served 10 years, received amnesty and was released in 1991, one year after Mandela was released and three years before the country’s first Democratic Election.

‘We must forgive!’

During an October 15 fellowship luncheon at Munger Place, Chamusso told the congregation he was glad the film was done while he was still alive.

“At first, I thought it wasn’t a good story, because I didn’t value myself as a human being,” Chamusso said. “The reason was the structure of apartheid in South Africa. It was directed at a black man. I couldn’t open a bank account in South Africa, because I must take a white man with me. I couldn’t buy a car without a white man. If there was a road block, they would pull me out of the car, search me and beat me in front of my children. But we said, ‘We forgive you people’. Through forgiveness, you let go of the anger and put it down. You forget it!”

Chamusso said he gets upset when people compare what he did in South Africa to current acts of terrorism.

“I think anyone who compares this to terrorism doesn’t understand,” he said. “There is no comparison. We were trying to remove apartheid. Our policy was, ‘No one must die’. We wanted to destroy apartheid, not kill.”

“The people in South Africa are going to be surprised when they see this movie. I was at the men’s breakfast at the Methodist Church; there were whites there, who wanted to know what was happening during apartheid. When people tell them about the people who have disappeared and were tortured, some say, ‘Oh, this is exaggerated.’ But that’s why we want to tell them, because they don’t know the truth.

We must tell the truth, but we must also forgive,” he said.

“And you shall know the truth…
and the truth shall set you free.”
*
Today Chamusso, his wife, Conney and their three children live in White River, a valley region north of Johannesburg. They have at least 80 orphans, whom they have adopted and care for through their ministry called ‘Two Sisters’.

“I wake up every morning and say, ‘Lord, thank you. For my life. Thank you, Lord for me still being alive.'”
*
Also attending the Munger Place United Methodist Church service was ‘Catch a Fire’ screenwriter Shawn Slovo, daughter of the late Joe Slovo. “I thought it was a good time to tell the story, because of the miracle of South Africa,” she said, explaining why she wrote the film.

The movie “about reconciliation is timely; because it has been a period of time that it seems like all hell has broken loose in the world,” Stovall said. “If you just browse the paper, you can see that violence has escalated around the globe. It all comes down to broken relationships. So as we make peace with God, it is possible for us to have peace.”

31 Oct 2006

“While we will not forget the brutality of apartheid, we will not want Robben Island to be a monument of our hardship and suffering. We would want it to be a triumph of the human spirit against the forces of evil. A triumph of wisdom and largeness of spirit against small minds and pettiness;
a triumph of courage and determination over human frailty and weakness; a triumph of the New South Africa over the old.”

– Ahmed Kathrada (who was imprisoned for 26 years. Prisoner No: 468/64)

To end off, here are a few thoughts on forgiveness…
“Forgiveness is not an occasional act – it is an attitude of mind.”
– Martin Luther King

“The noblest revenge is to forgive.”
– Thomas Fuller, English author (1608-1661)

His (Mandela’s) ability to rise above his conditions, to stay positive and remain focussed. His dignity, humility and character. He is a model for everyone, especially his total lack of bitterness towards his former enemies. “There is no time to be bitter – there is work to be done.”

A tribute to the symbolic presence of dignity and strength. “Madiba’s’strength of will and character. (“He took Christianity to the market-place.”) Mandela embraced his enemies with love in a “Christ-like selflessness”, epitomising a “Divine Grace” in the human condition. He truly BELIEVED in his mission, never wavering in his convictions. One man’s commitment to a noble cause – what one man can do preaching reconciliation. “My mission is embracing the wounds of my country.” He gives pride to all black people. What men can do with a noble mission.
“If I don’t forgive my enemies, I deny my right to have power over them.”
– Martin Luther King or Robert Kennedy??

“One man can make a difference.”
– Robert Kennedy

“Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.
– Martin Luther King, Jr (1929-1968, American Black Leader, Nobel Prize Winner, 1964)

“Violence breeds violence, repression brings retaliation, and only a cleansing of our whole society can remove this sickness from our soul.” So eulogised Robert Kennedy after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr in April 1968.

“Tolerance implies no lack of commitment to one’s own beliefs. Rather it condemns the oppression or persecution of others.”
– John F Kennedy

“Someday, after we have mastered the winds, the waves, the tide and gravity, we shall harness for God the energies of love. Then, for the second time in the history of the world, man will have discovered fire.”
– Teilhard De Chardin

About the submitter:
Craig is passionate about his former country, South Africa and writes about the “Beloved Country” in his novels. The story of ‘Catch a Fire’ has a lot of meaning to his life and shares important themes from his own writings. In his various writings Craig strives in some small way to break down social, cultural, religious and economic barriers through “planting, then sowing ideas as ‘seeds of hope’”. He believes that whilst we should celebrate our differences, what we share is way more important than what divides us. Craig’s new work ‘A New Dawn’ is set in the Middle East: To attempt to find ‘common ground’/principles between different religions and cultures and to try to make some difference in building bridges in an ever more dangerous, turbulent and uncertain world. “A passionate story of inspiration: hope, faith, peace and especially love.”
The various books that Craig “felt inspired to write” are available at

“The world’s smallest and most exclusive bookstore”

“Together, one mind, one life at a time, let’s plant the seeds, the hope for a better and brighter future.”

THESE THOUGHTS MAY BE FREELY PUBLISHED

PPS

“There are those who look at things the way they are, and ask ‘why’? I dream of things that never were, and ask ‘why not’?”

~Robert F. Kennedy

“Few (of us) will have the greatness to bend history itself, but each of us can work to change a small portion of events. It is from numberless diverse acts of courage and belief that human history is shaped. Each time a man (or woman) stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice, (she or) he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope, and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring those ripples build a current which can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance.”
— the powerful and greatly inspiring words of Robert F. Kennedy (with my little insertions in brackets)

“Lord,

Help lift our eyes a little higher”

.

.

CRAIG’S BOOKS ON SOUTH AFRICA

July 28, 2012
My first novel

My first novel

CRAIG’S BOOKS ON SOUTH AFRICA

THE JOURNEY IS PART OF THE DESTINATION

Craig’s various novels on South Africa have led him to this point “on the writing journey”

http://www.amazon.com/End-Line-Craig-Lock/dp/B0030B8HBU/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpi_11

The End of the Line (South Africa) by Craig Lock (Aug 17, 2011)

The New Rainbow by Craig Lock (Feb 14, 2012)

Angolan Dawn by Craig Lock (Aug 10, 2011)

. OVER THE RAINBOW (RAINBOWS) by Craig Lock (Aug 11, 2011)

Dropped Out in Godzone by Craig Lock and Marie Lock (Apr 4, 1997)

CAPE TOWN: The Beautiful “Mother City” (of South Africa) by craig lock and Gordon Richardson (Dec 26, 2011)

A Tribute to Nelson Mandela (Madiba) (A Tribute to Ayrtion Senna, A tribute to Martin Luther-King) by Craig Lock and craig (Jan 29, 2012)

The Awakened Spirit (A New Dawn and Craig’s Spiritual Books) by Craig Lock (Aug 13, 2004)

Angolan Dawn by Craig Lock (Jan 31, 2012)

The Awakening (Savuka)* (A New Dawn) by craig lock (Dec 29, 2011)

The New Rainbow (Rainbows) by Craig Lock (Aug 12, 2011)

I’ll Do It My Way: My Story by Craig Lock (Aug 10, 2011)

# Return of the Chickens by Craig Lock (Aug 11, 2011)

MY LIFELONG LOVE AFFAIR WITH SPORT by Craig Lock (Aug 11, 2011)

The End Of The Line (Volume 1) by Craig Lock (Feb 7, 2012)

Paperback: $10.90

The various books* that Craig “felt inspired to write” are available at: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4 and http://www.creativekiwis.com/amazon.html

All proceeds go to needy and underprivileged children – mine!

CRAIG’S BOOKS ON SOUTH AFRICA

THE JOURNEY IS PART OF THE DESTINATION

Craig’s various novels on South Africa have led him to this point “on the writing journey”

http://www.amazon.com/End-Line-Craig-Lock/dp/B0030B8HBU/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpi_11

http://www.amazon.com/End-Line-South-Africa-ebook/dp/B005HY6YLI/ref=sr_1_38?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1325174942&sr=1-38http://www.amazon.com/New-Rainbow-Craig-Lock/dp/B0030B4FLG

 

http://www.amazon.com/Angolan-Dawn-ebook/dp/B005GSGSQG/

 Angolan Dawn by Craig Lock (Jan 31, 2012)

http://www.amazon.com/Angolan-Dawn-Craig-Lock/dp/0473166852

http://www.amazon.com/OVER-RAINBOW-RAINBOWS-ebook/dp/B005GYIFK2/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpi_8

http://www.amazon.com/End-Rainbow-ebook/dp/B004YTPE9A/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpi

To the End of the Rainbow

http://www.amazon.com/To-End-Rainbow-ebook/dp/B004YTPE9A

The various books* that Craig “felt inspired to write” are available at: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B005GGMAW4 and http://www.creativekiwis.com/amazon.html

All proceeds go to needy and underprivileged children – mine!

My first novel